Marketing Lessons Shared By Experts On Sprouter

Marketing Lessons Shared By Experts On Sprouter



Sprouter is where founders get help with their startups. Sprouter allows entrepreneurs to get curated answers to small business questions from people who know what they’re talking about. Fortunately Sprouter has not closed its doors yet after the announcement by Sarah Prevette(the founder).

The following are some marketing lessons shared by experts on Sprouter.

  1. If you solve a genuine problem and talk honestly and engagingly about your solution people will pay attention. Scott Rutherford -Founder, UserVoice.
  2. You don’t need to do any marketing until you can validate that you’ve built something that anyone will won’t. Launch first, then see if anyone cares. Dan Martell-Founder of Flowtown.com & Investor. Expert on social media marketing and lean startup methodology.
  3. I generally caution against advertisingbefore you launch, if you are a small business. But contacting prospective partners, customers and your network to let them know that you’ve got something in the works, and building permissioned lists via email and social networks is a great way to get the word out. Jen Evans- Founder, Sequentia Environics
  4. I still believe that writing a good blog is a cornerstone for a content strategy for almost any business.-Benjamin Yoskovitz-Founder of Standout Jobs, author of Instigator Blog, partner at Year One Labs seed accelerator.
  5. A business blog is  not about YOUR BUSINESS, it’s about the industry, the market, the problems. Benjamin Yoskovitz-Founder of Standout Jobs
  6. don’t write a press release titled “COMPANY X ANNOUNCED NEW WEBSITE” unless there is something pretty spectacular or groundbreaking about it.Jen Evans-Founder, Sequentia Environics
  7. Plug your keyword list into http://search.twitter.com/to see who is talking about you/your space/your competitors on twitter in real time.  Maggie Fox -Founder, Social Media Group
  8. The best place to spend money is where your cost per customer is less than the lifetime value of that customer.
  9. I spend a fair amount of time on blog post headlines, although less than I used to. But they’re critical to getting attention. Lists work very well. Benjamin Yoskovitz- Founder of Standout Jobs

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