When it comes to branding your company and getting consumers on board, you have to enter a market with the full intention to take what is rightfully yours. Business is not for the weak or the squeamish; so, when you enter a market, you enter the battleground where competition is fierce: a place in which nerves of steel and an unwavering resolve is what separates the failed startups from the tried and true success stories.

If you are not ready to position your company as a winner in this new market, you will find that throwing your hat into the ring was a waste of time and money. The following are three key components for marking your territory and letting everyone know your company’s products are the superior choice in which consumers can place their full confidence and trust.

1. You must have a plan of attack

When it comes to breaking into a new market, your approach is going to dictate how the competition and consumers react to the waves you will be making. Before you even think of making your presence known, you must know who the competition is, and you must have a firm grasp on the results these companies are getting from their own marketing efforts.

Remember, your competition is your greatest roadblock to potential customers. Learning where their marketing strategies are weak and how to best take advantage of their missed opportunities can play a huge part in getting a leg up on established companies who are not even expecting a rival to enter the market in which they are used to maintaining control.

2. Superior products breed superior business success

When it comes to disrupting a market with new products, you need to introduce products that your competition is going to have a difficult time touching. Business professional Dallin Larsen shares his success came partly from finding a disruptive concept in the niche market that created change for the consumer.

When consumers in your market feel the superior effects of your product and know why it is delivering more bang for their buck, this is how you get repeat sales and a loyal consumer base that will cling to your product, because it is the clear winner.

Modern consumers are not as easily fooled as in years past. Today’s consumer can more easily identify which products are superior in a given market and will demand those products continue to produce superior quality results.

This means your company has to be ready to deliver the same level of quality products, or better, every time its products hit the market; otherwise, your customers will start to look elsewhere for the superior quality they expected you to deliver.

3. Speak your customer’s language

When attempting to grab massive volumes of market share from your competitors and show them your company means business, you must make the effort to relate to the consumer base of that market in a solid way. This goes beyond simply trying to figure out who your most radical customer is that will be using your products.

You must also have the insight to know how to get down on your ideal customer’s level and speak their language as if your company is one of them. When consumer moves beyond identifying with your company’s products to identifying with your company’s vision, only then have you truly won the heart of the consumer.

This means your company needs to know what issues get the market you are entering on fire. When your company supports their vision, your customer cannot help but believe your company and its products are right with their core beliefs. It is this perception that gives your company the ability to tether yourself to the consumer in a way that other companies are not truly connecting with them.

Breaking into a market today requires a whole new psychology from years past. Today’s consumers see themselves as having real ideas and want to belong to something far bigger than themselves. Companies that will dominate in the markets they enter will relate to these consumer ideals and orient their company vision to fit with the direction in which the consumer base is heading for maximum results.

Emma is a freelance writing currently living in Boston, MA. She writes most often on business and technology.